Tag Archives: New Orleans

Food, Food & More Food Part I

By Beth Friedman
@FoodTravelrBeth

I am obsessed with food. In a former life I must have been a chef, a Jewish Grandmother or an Italian Mama because I love to cook, I LOVE to eat and I love to feed people. It’s a wonder that I don’t weigh 300 pounds because I wake up every morning wondering what my next meal will be. This is no different, and actually gets worse when I travel because to me, one of the key ingredients (forgive the pun) to a great trip is to experience the cuisine of wherever I am. Whether it be a perfect goulash in Budapest, garlicky and tender escargot with some creamy Camembert in Paris, steak or grill in Buenos Aires, pastry in Vienna, pasta in Italy, BBQ in Texas or bagels in New York City, I B-line to all of it!

My most recent trip was to Paris with my boyfriend Joe, where eating our way around the city and drinking our fair share of Sancerre was at the top of our priority list. Each day started with buttery, flakey, freshly baked croissants from a local boulangerie and eaten on the go.

While most think of fine dining, perfect plating and complex sauces in French cuisine, I learned the lesson of simplicity in food again on this trip. And it could not have been demonstrated better than at a wonderful spot called Cafe Allard, an old school bistro located in the 6th arrondissement (St. Germain). A friend who lives in Paris 50% of the time recommended it to us, and we found it appealing because it’s frequented by locals. Crowded and loud, with tables packed together, you are instantly and tightly integrated into Paris life here. When we were seated, we noticed that at the table next to us they were digging into a whole roasted and carved chicken with potatoes that smelled so good that we almost didn’t need to see the menu. But it seemed so unexciting that we tried our hand at taking a look even though we were struggling with our French. When the waiter came to take our order and we pointed at our neighbors dish to ask what it was (duh), he looked at us like we were crazy, and with a good-natured, funny expression on his face and a shrug, just said “chicken”. It was a good laugh, so we ended up going with the chicken for fear butchering the language by trying to order from the menu. This turned out to be a great decision because that simple roasted chicken was one of the best things either of us had every eaten. We were blown away by how delicious something so seemingly ordinary could be. The meat was so tender, juicy and ‘chickeny’ (is that a word?), with skin that was so perfectly crispy! I was so distracted from the very first bite, that I forgot to take a picture of it. What you see below was taken a little to late to do it justice, but those potatoes you see? Well they were unbelievable as well!

I could write all day about eating our way through Paris but instead, let’s go to Germany. On another memorable journey, this one along the Danube River with AMA Waterways (my top pick for river cruising throughout Europe), we stopped in Regansburg where we were introduced to the world’s oldest sausage stand called Wurschtla (Wurstk├╝che ). It is said to be over 500 years old and was built to feed the workers building the original ‘Old Stone Bridge”. You can’t travel throughout this part of the world without being bombarded with each region’s variation of sausage. Sitting here at picnic tables (in December mind you), this historic food establishment serves open fire-grilled sausages that are simple, salty, fatty and crispy and placed on a bed of sauerkraut with bread. Don’t be embarrassed to order 5 all for yourself! YUM.

To take a turn to the lighter, sunnier side of food, when traveling to Tahiti and the islands of the South Pacific, you’ll find that their national dish of Poisson Cru is on almost every menu, and every household has their own recipe. It’s a ceviche of sorts, made with the freshest tuna, chopped cucumber, tomato, onion, lemon juice and freshly squeezed coconut juice. I had a lot of fun at the Four Seasons Bora Bora (a magnificent resort by the way!), where the chef held a Poisson Cru demonstration at one of their lovely restaurants, Arii Moana. Then challenged us (a group of travel agents) to compete against one another to come up with our own version. They provided some great ingredients for us to choose from and I decided to go with the fresh tuna ( a must), chopped green apple, chopped green onion, thinly sliced kumquat, a drizzle of tangerine infused olive oil, lime juice and coconut milk.

I am proud to say that I won this little competition!

When traveling it’s always fun to challenge one’s palette, so I’ll never forget my re-introduction to the anchovy. I am usually a pretty ambitious and adventurous eater, so in the past I had tried my hand at this salty little fish and HATED it. But it was a true revelation when I was coaxed into another tasting while in Ravello Italy at a hosted luncheon by the Hotel Caruso at their lovely terrace restaurant, Caruso. I wrote about this in a previous blog posting, but since it was a true culinary “a-ha” moment in my life (credit to Oprah!), I thought it was worth another mention.

My anchovy turnaround came from an interesting little ingredient called colutura, which is anchovy juice. To me anchovy juice sounds just plain gross and when the dish of spaghetti was placed in front of me and proudly described by the chef, I wanted to push it away and skip to the next course. But I didn’t want to insult our hosts, and dug in. The spaghetti was cooked perfectly, and the flavors were salty, but fresh and bright! The colutura is mixed with lemon and fruity olive oil with a touch of hot chili flakes, and it’s flavors were so different and simple that just writing about it now has me transported back to Italy. It was truly an eye-opener and a perfect example of how going outside your comfort zone in food can truly expand your horizons.

I can’t complete this posting without spending some time closer to home, so let’s go to New Orleans which is the epitome of a food lover’s fantasy. You’ve heard all of the hoopla about things like Po’ Boys, jambalaya, blackened fish, gumbo, begniets and so much more, so I’ll keep it simple here and focus on one stand out dish. I’m talking about the grilled oysters at Acme Oyster House, which is a much loved New Orleans institution that is frequented by both tourists and locals (be prepared to wait on line to get it!). Large gulf oysters, shucked and topped with melted garlic butter, lots of herbs, white wine, a dash of worcestershire sauce and Romano cheese are lined up onto the grill and cooked just until bubbly. They are completely addictive with a salty, briny, garlicky yumminess that leaves you aching for just one more. It’s another example of simplicity in food with huge flavor, texture and personality. To me they scream New Orleans on a plate.

I could write forever about all of the fun and interesting food I’ve eaten while traveling, so I’m going to keep going with another Your Journey By Beth posting about it soon. I hope that in writing about it I can encourage a few picky eaters to go outside of their culinary comfort zone. To be honest, I’m perplexed by folks who spend a lot of money and time to travel and experience far away places, then seek out Starbucks, McDonald’s and only order dishes that seem familiar to them. Traveling can be a thrill in so many ways and can appeal to all of your senses. Your taste buds are a wonderful and delicious way to learn about how other cultures nourish their bodies, their souls, their family and friends.

Stay tuned for more on food! And if you’re looking for travel tips, ideas and recommendations, you can reach me at:

Journey By Beth
310-804-6767
journeybybeth@gmail.com

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Filed under Culture, Europe, food, Foodie, Fun, Getaway, Italy, New Orleans, travel

Muffalettas and Sazeracs-A Look Back at Bringing in 2010

@BethLovesTravel
facebook.com/beth.friedman1

For the holidays last year, my boyfriend Joe and I went to New Orleans to eat, drink and be merry! I had been to The Big Easy several times before for work, and was so happy to finally have the freedom to enjoy the city on my own terms and to be there during the most festive time of year (well, besides Mardi Gras)!

For the hotel, we decided on the Monteleone, which spoke to our mood at the time we booked it. We wanted something old with a little bit of infamy in the French Quarter. This family run hotel has been in business since 1886, is haunted (though we never saw a ghost), has a famous lounge called the Carousel Bar and was perfectly located for us. It is kind of kitchy, the rooms were cozy and it oozed New Orleans in it’s atmosphere.

Joe and I are all about oysters, so when we arrived, the first thing we wanted to do was find some! Fortunately for us, Acme Oyster House was right around the corner! This place is famous for its huge gulf oysters (grilled and raw), po’ boys, crawfish, and an enormous selection of regional seafood. The fact that both locals and tourists both line up outside to eat here is a testament to its great food. We ordered the grilled oysters first and loved them so much that we had to have a second plate. I took a photo to capture the moment but unfortunately it doesn’t do them justice. I hope you’ll trust that these little beauties that were bubbling with butter and romano cheese were absolutely sumptuous.

After the second helping, we had a dozen raw and then decided that it was time to move on to check out some music. We walked over to Bourbon Street and had a blast wandering in and out of club after club, listening to everything from Jazz, to Blues to Rock n Roll. This went on for 5 fabulous days and extended out into the other districts of the city where there are countless places to find live music.

New Orleans was of course still in recovery mode from Katrina and as you probably know, the French Quarter survived much better than much of the city. But tourism had not yet fully bounced back. It was incredibly clear to us how much our presence, along with the influx of visitors for the Sugar Bowl and the holidays was most appreciated. Everyone from the street performers, to the shop owners, pub owners and restaurant owners were quick to ask us to tell our friends that New Orleans is OPEN FOR BUSINESS! I’ve been doing that ever since.

For hotels, New Orleans caters to all tastes. Some of the best include the venerable Windsor Court, The Ritz Carlton and the W French Quarter. There are a ton of bed and breakfasts, Inns and smaller properties scattered throughout each distinct district including the Garden District/Uptown, Magazine and of course, the French Quarter. When you decide to plan your trip, let me know and we’ll find the perfect place for you!

My favorite meals on this trip ran the gamut. At Irene’s in the French quarter, the ambiance is warm, romantic, eclectic and crowded. Definitely make a reservation, but if you end up waiting, they’ll serve you wine and entertain you with a fun in-house pianist. The food is Cajun/Italian and we had a lasagna that was killer and their famous rosemary chicken, which I’ve desperately tried to recreate at home, but can’t.

The muffalettas and sazaracs at Napoleon House were DE-licous and personified New Orleans. Hurricanes at Pat O’Briens are a tradition in New Orleans too, but I prefer the Sazerac or a Pimms Cup!

The BBQ shrimp po’boys at Luizza’s by the racetrack were crazy (if you’ve ever gone to Jazz Fest, then you may have been there!) and the Frogs Legs at K-Pauls were yummy! I can’t forget to mention another oyster extravaganza at Casamentos, which has been around since 1919. This is not to be missed, and frankly not someplace overcrowded with tourists. It’s located on Magazine Street, which has too many great shops, bars, art galleries and restaurants to count. For fantastic down home, real deal cajun cuisine and soul food, Dooky Chase is the way to go! It’s in an iffy part of the city, but don’t let that stop you!

We were in a pretty touristy mood, so decided to take a horse (actually a donkey) and buggy ride around the French Quarter and this turned out to be such a blast! Our tour guide, Susan, was hilarious and seemed to know everything about the city. It was fun and informative, and best of all, we made a new friend. During the ride, we approached the famous Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar, and Susan asked if we wanted to stop for a drink. Heaven forbid we pass up the opportunity for a cocktail, so we said sure! Susan stopped the buggy and we gathered our stuff to get out, but instead, at the top of her lungs, Susan yelled “TAKE OUT”!!!!! into the bar. Seconds later, the bartender came out and took our order. It was such a laugh and having a beer to enjoy for the rest of our tour made it that much more fun.

As we get ready to bring in 2011, I couldn’t help but reminisce about welcoming 2010, and writing this blog has brought back some great memories! I love New Orleans and can’t wait to go back because 5 days barely scratched the surface of what there is to do, see and of course eat!

I wish everybody out there a HEALTHY, happy and prosperous 2011! May it be filled with many great adventures!

For more information about the hotels and restaurants I’ve included here (and some that I didn’t squeeze into these 971 words), you can find me at:

journeybybeth@yahoo.com
beth@elitetravelinternational.com
310-804-6767

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Filed under food, Holiday, travel, USA